Thyme

Thyme

Thyme is an herb with culinary, medicinal and ornamental uses. Thyme is of the genus Thymus, most commonly Thymus vulgaris.

Allergy Alert:

A thyme allergy is an adverse reaction by the body’s immune system to thyme or food containing thyme. This type of allergy is rare and serious reactions are very rare. The body’s immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE – an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin, respiratory and behavioral symptoms (Health Grades Inc., 2014).

Common Uses:

Fresh thyme is commonly sold in bunches of sprigs. A sprig is a single stem snipped from the plant. It is composed of a woody stem with paired leaf or flower clusters (“leaves”) spaced 1⁄2 to 1″ apart. A recipe may measure thyme by the bunch (or fraction thereof), or by the sprig, or by the tablespoon or teaspoon. Dried thyme is widely used in Armenia (called Urc) in teas. Depending on how it is used in a dish, the whole sprig may be used (e.g. in a bouquet garni), or the leaves removed and the stems discarded. Usually when a recipe specifies “bunch” or “sprig”, it means the whole form; when it specifies spoons it means the leaves. It is perfectly acceptable to substitute dried for whole thyme (Wikipedia, n.d.).

Nutritional Information:

Amount Per 1 tsp (0.8 g)
Calories 1
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0 g
Monounsaturated fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 0 mg 0%
Potassium 5 mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 0.2 g 0%
Dietary fiber 0.1 g 0%
Protein 0 g 0%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 2%
Calcium 0% Iron 0%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 0%
Vitamin B-12 0% Magnesium 0%

Source Wikipedia. (Note: This is not intended to be used, as it was copied and pasted from a Google search)

 

Dietary Information and Related Articles:

Here is a link to a website that outlines some of the many benefits of thyme.