Salmon

Salmon

Salmon is the common name for several species of fish in the family Salmonidae. Other fish in the same family include trout, char, grayling and whitefish.

Allergy Alert:

Skin, eye, nose and digestive tract allergy symptoms are among the effects of exposure to salmon. Touching fish can produce itching and skin irritation at the point of contact. Inhaling steam from cooking or eating an allergenic fish can cause itchy and swollen eyes, lips and throat, nasal congestion and digestive upset, including vomiting and diarrhea. In rare allergic reactions, cardiovascular complications can cause dizziness and loss of consciousness (Clarke, 2010).

Common Uses:

The vast majority of Atlantic salmon available around the world are farmed (almost 99%), whereas the majority of Pacific salmon are wild-caught (greater than 80%). Canned salmon in the US is usually wild Pacific catch, though some farmed salmon is available in canned form. Smoked salmon is another popular preparation method, and can either be hot or cold smoked. Lox can refer to either cold-smoked salmon or salmon cured in a brine solution (also called gravlax). Traditional canned salmon includes some skin (which is harmless) and bone (which adds calcium). Skinless and boneless canned salmon is also available (Wikipedia, n.d.).

Nutritional Information:

Amount Per 0.5 fillet (198 g)
Calories 412
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 27 g 41%
Saturated fat 6 g 30%
Polyunsaturated fat 8 g
Monounsaturated fat 7 g
Cholesterol 109 mg 36%
Sodium 117 mg 4%
Potassium 719 mg 20%
Total Carbohydrate 0 g 0%
Dietary fiber 0 g 0%
Protein 40 g 80%
Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 12%
Calcium 1% Iron 3%
Vitamin B-6 65% Vitamin B-12 106%
Magnesium 13%

Source Wikipedia. (Note: This is not intended to be used, as it was copied and pasted from a Google search)

Dietary Information and Related Articles:

Here is a link to an interesting website describing the health benefits of salmon.